Extra Questions Answers A Different Kind of School Class 6 English

 Extra Questions with Answers Class 6 English Honeysuckle Chapter 5 A Different Kind of School

Here we, Textual Solution are providing Extra Questions and Answers of Chapter A Different Kind of School

Very Short Answer Questions (a word/phrase or a sentence)

Q.1. Who was in charge of A Different kind of School ?
Answer:
Miss Beam

Q.2. What was the first impression of the author about Miss Beam's School ?
Answer:
The author's first impression about the school was not favourable. He was pained to see a blind girl led by a little boy.

Q.3. What subjects were taught at Miss Beam's school ?
Answer:
The subjects taught at Miss Beam's school were math and language.

Q.4. What was the real aim of Miss Beam's school ?
Answer:
To make children understand the problems of the handicapped people and to help them readily.

Q.5. What pained the author when he saw children in the playground ?
Answer:
He was pained to see some blind and some crippled children.

Q.6. List the various days for a special training of the children.
Answer:
One blind day, one lame day, one deaf day and one dumb day.

Q.7. What made Miss Beam laugh while talking with the author ?
Answer:
She laughed at misunderstanding of the author that some of the children were blind or lame.

Q.8. Which day was really the worst day, according to some children ?
Answer:
The blind day was really the most difficult one to some children.

Short Answer Questions (Answer in 30 - 40 words)

Q.1. What did Miss Beam's education system or school aim at ?
Answer:
Miss Beam's school aimed at promoting the spirit of helping one another. I did not try to teach great ideas and thoughts. It aimed at making children thoughtful, kind and helpful to others. In short, it aimed at making them responsible citizens.

Q.2. What did the author notice in the playground that pained him ?
Answer:
The author looked out of the window and saw children playing in the ground. Most of them were jolly but a few were not quite healthy and active-looking. They were either blind or crippled.

Q.3. 'This is a very important part of our system.' How did Miss Beam explain her system of teaching ?
Answer:
Miss Beam explained to the author that none of the children were blind or crippled. They were only playing a game. Being blind or lame, deaf or dumb was really something of a game. Every child during a term had to experience some sort of misfortune for a day. He or she also helped others in that misfortune. Thus they learnt to understand and share the suffering of others.

Q.4. What did Miss Beam and the bandaged girl say about the blind day ?
Answer:
Miss Beam clarified that the child's eyes on the blind day were bandaged overnight. He was guided and helped all day by another boy. Some said that the blind day was the worst or most difficult. The bandaged girl also said the same thing. It was awful. Every moment she felt that she was going to be hit by something.

Q.5. What made the author discover that he had become very thoughtful ?
Answer:
The author described persons and things to the bandaged girl as they walked about together. He observed the colour of their dress of their hair while telling about them. This exercise sharpened his power to observe thoughtfully and accurately. It also made those things and persons more interesting to him.

Q.6. How was Miss Beam's school different from other common schools ?
Answer:
Miss Beam's school did not follow the traditional pattern of teaching. It aimed not at putting big ideas and information into the child's head, but at making them better persons and model citizens. Its originality lay in giving them first hand experience of misfortune and its management.

Long Answer Questions (Answer in about 100 words)

Q.1. Give an account of Miss Beam's personality.
                           OR
        Write a character sketch of Miss Beam.
Answer:
Miss Beam was in charge of the School with a Difference. It was a laboratory for experiment of her original ideas. She tried to promote the feeling of brotherhood and active sympathy for those in trouble. In other words, she wanted the children to become better persons and responsible citizens. This part of training is neglected altogether in common schools.
Miss Beam was a middle aged lady, a little plump but loving, kind and intelligent. She had new ideas about real education. She believed that her schools had a duty towards the society. She tried to give practical training to the kids to become noble hearted persons and to serve the needy.
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